New Testament Scholarship—A Lament

Is it just me who sees the steep decline in the quality of New Testament scholarship? I don’t think so. I look at the numerous textbooks that are being published—I know, these do not, let me repeat, do not count as scholarship—and they are full of all sorts of useless nonsense designed to keep the […]

First-Century Mark Continues to Raise Questions

The supposed first-century Mark fragment—now shown to be second or third century (P.Oxy. 5345; vol. 83; P137)—continues to raise questions throughout the blogosphere. After many blog postings and side discussions, including circulation of a supposed contract between Dirk Obbink and Hobby Lobby regarding selling some papyri, possibly the Mark fragment, a number of parties owe […]

A Response to Runge’s Response to Porter’s Response to Runge in the latest BBR

Not too long ago, I received the latest issue of the Bulletin for Biblical Research (BBR), the journal of the Institute for Biblical Research (IBR), of which I am a fairly recent member. I appreciate IBR for its attention to scholarship within an evangelical framework and am excited to be a contributing member of this […]

Book Announcement: Porter, When Paul Met Jesus

One of the contributors to this blog, our most prolific author, Stanley Porter, has another book published called When Paul Met Jesus: How an Idea Got Lost in History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016). Porter revives a theory set forth earlier by William Ramsay, Johannes Weiss, and James Hope Moulton, that Paul had seen Jesus […]

“Did Jesus Really Exist?” and Social Memory

Brian Bethune, in a recent article, “Did Jesus Really Exist,” published in Maclean’s Magazine (28 March/4 April 2016), writes, “The reason Biblical historians cannot find even the outline of a historical Jesus, argues an increasingly persuasive chorus of challengers, is that there is nothing to find: Jesus Christ never lived at all” (39). Here we […]

Third and Final Post on Campbell’s Advances in the Study of Greek

In this final post, I deal with chapters 6-10 of Campbell’s book (see Part One and Part Two). This final post might seem longer than the first two parts, and in fact is, because I found it necessary to say more about the chapters on discourse analysis. Chapter 6 focuses upon idiolect, genre, and register. […]

Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism

In this post, I wish to introduce the Journal of Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism (JGRChJ) to authors and scholars who may wish to publish their work on any subject related to Greco-Roman Christianity and Judaism. I especially wish to invite future, potential authors (as well as interested scholars) to survey and read past articles of the journal […]

Why Linguistics Is Necessary for Interpreting the Biblical Text

I am a multilingual. My (chronologically) first language is Korean, because I grew up with Korean immigrant parents who knew little English. But English is my native language. I also took Spanish in high school and lived for most of my life in Los Angeles, so I can confidently say I speak broken Español. I […]