Forging Linguistic Identities: Language in the Nation, the Region, and the World

Two of our bloggers, Stanley Porter and Hughson Ong, are at a linguistics conference at Towson University in Maryland, for Friday and Saturday, 17-18 March. Stan and Hughson presented a paper at this same conference two years ago (the conference happens every two years), and were invited to propose a section for it for this […]

The Bingham Colloquium on Linguistics and the Bible at McMaster Divinity College

Earlier this summer, McMaster Divinity College hosted its annual Bingham Colloquium, this year with the theme of Linguistics and the Bible: Retrospect and Prospects (last year’s summary on the theme of the gospel was reported by Hughson). The three major sub-topics were Linguistics, Translation, and Exegesis. As usual, several guests were invited to present papers […]

Thoughts on Koine Greek Pronunciation

Believe it or not, there are some strong opinions on how to pronounce Koine Greek, a language that has been dead for over seventeen-hundred years. For example, Constantine Campbell, in his recent book Advances in the Study of Greek: New Insights for Reading the New Testament (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2015) (see reviews of this book […]

Third and Final Post on Campbell’s Advances in the Study of Greek

In this final post, I deal with chapters 6-10 of Campbell’s book (see Part One and Part Two). This final post might seem longer than the first two parts, and in fact is, because I found it necessary to say more about the chapters on discourse analysis. Chapter 6 focuses upon idiolect, genre, and register. […]

Why Linguistics Is Necessary for Interpreting the Biblical Text

I am a multilingual. My (chronologically) first language is Korean, because I grew up with Korean immigrant parents who knew little English. But English is my native language. I also took Spanish in high school and lived for most of my life in Los Angeles, so I can confidently say I speak broken Español. I […]

A Review of Campbell’s Advances in the Study of Greek: Part Two

In this second post, I look at Chapters One to Five of Campbell’s Advances in the Study of Greek. (See Part One.) After a brief introduction that outlines the contents, need for, and uses of the book, Campbell offers a short history of study of Greek from the nineteenth century to the present. I agree […]

A Review of Constantine Campbell’s Advances in the Study of Greek: Part One

The idea for this book is theoretically a commendable one, and Campbell has written at a very elementary level—which is a good feature for those who genuinely do not have much acquaintance with the subject (however, those who really know the field will find that there is a lot of simplification). However, for such a […]